Treatment of colorectal cancer

 

Treatment of colorectal cancer

The genetic mass of the cancer cells in colorectal cancer mutates over time. This means that the chemotherapy treatment must be adapted to achieve full effect; a challenge common to most cancers. New drugs are usually introduced on a continuous basis as additions to existing drugs rather than substitutes. These additional treatments are included in new combinations designed to increase the effect of the treatment. The 5-FU-based combination, where arfolitixorin is being tested, is and will be a cornerstone treatment for colorectal cancer for the foreseeable future.

As the colorectal cancer develops into more advanced and widespread stages of the disease, the use of cytotoxins, biologicals and other targeted drugs increases. Radiation is sometimes administered, especially to patients with localised tumours.

Stage IV ­– initial treatment area for arfolitixorin

At stage IV, when the cancer has spread beyond the intestine, surgery is usually avoided, as it does not positively affect the prognosis. Surgery is thus only resorted to in cases where, for example, the tumour mechanically blocks the intestinal passage. Cytotoxins are the primary treatment, which aim to relieve symptoms and prolong the survival of the patient. Sometimes other forms of therapy are also used. Although newly developed drugs are being introduced to supplement existing combinations and improve treatment outcomes, the 5-FU-based treatment combination is also expected to remain a cornerstone in the treatment of colorectal cancer according to Isofol and the company’s international clinical experts. Despite additional, introduced treatment options, this combination has made the largest contribution to the survival rates over time, see the illustration below of the colorectal cancer stages.
Radiation therapy, which plays a prominent role in the treatment of many forms of tumours, is used primarily in rectal cancer). Immunotherapy uses the patient’s own immune system to inhibit tumours disorders. The recent, high profile immunotherapeutic drugs have so far had limited clinical value for patients with colorectal cancer. So far, immunotherapy is especially applicable in small, well-defined groups of CRC patients (only approx. 4% of patients with mCRC benefit from treatment with current immunotherapy).